Scholarship Recipients

Panagiota Tania spent the first two months of the past year in the U.S. reporting on President Trump's upheaval of the U.S. immigration system. In late February, she moved to Beirut, Lebanon to take a four-month intensive Arabic course. While there she visited much of the country and really improved her Arabic language, which she believes will help in her future reporting on refugees. This summer, I was back on campus at Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism, teaching a five-week summer program for budding high school journalists. She'll be staying in the U.S. for another few months to continue her freelance reporting on changes to our immigration system.

Last year she completed a U.S. Fulbright Fellowship where she was based in Athens, Greece for one year researching and reporting on Europe's refugee crisis. Her work has been published in The Huffington Post, Reuters, and Mashable, among other publications. See a full list of her recent work here.

Tania lived and worked in New York after graduation from Northwestern in June 2011, working for a small daily newspaper covering courts and legal education. Tania also did work for The Wall Street Journal, Crain's New York Business, SmartMoney magazine, Fast Company magazine, American Lawyer magazine, the Tampa Bay Times, and other publications. Tania also ran her first marathon in Chicago in October 2012 and, as of that time, was training for more!

Tania is a graduate of Amos Alonzo Stagg High School in Illinois, where she earned a 4.3 GPA. She was involved in a huge number of extracurricular activities. These included class secretary, National Honor Society, student council, leader of 'Relay for Life', and the school newspaper where she was editor-in-chief. She is also a lifelong student of dance, and found that her successes in dance gave her confidence to overcome the obstacles created by her profound hearing loss.

Tania's letters of recommendation glow. For example, one person wrote: "What an amazing young lady! I see the differences that she is making in our school community now, and I anticipate the changes she will cause for the future -- wherever she is."